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Author: Neal Poland

Everyone’s Drinking Fireball and Other Irresponsible Liquor

Everyone’s Drinking Fireball and Other Irresponsible Liquor

photoYesterday,  Feb. 22, was the “official opener” of cycling season in Seattle. That means two things: Cascade Bicycle Club’s annual Chilly Hilly  30 mile group ride around Bainbridge Island, and the cheaper, funner alternative ride: .83’s F—ing Hills Race (FHR).

The FHR is always held on the same day, on the same course and at the same time as the Chilly Hilly. In contrast to Cascade’s paid entry fees and manned rest stops, the FHR is free to enter (but you have to pay for your own ferry boat ticket, 9 bucks) and is fully self supported and features copious amounts of beer, liquor and other things that are legal here in Washington State, but still federally blacklisted. There are also prizes and priceless shenanigans.

After riding my first FHR a couple of years ago, I decided that this ride was more fun, and cheaper.

And they feed you at the end of the ride.

On the Cascade ride, you have to buy your own bowl of chili at the finish line.

Instead of bib numbers, the .83 riders attach small pirate flags to themselves, each other, and small children.

This year’s FHR began as all FHR’s do. Riders gathered on the Seattle waterfront, signed up for the “registration,” and promptly began sipping on cans of Rainier beer and pulling from flasks that were being passed around the group.

At 8 AM.

Once we arrived at the ferry terminal, the Washington State Ferry workers did a good job of segregating the Cascade riders from the .83 riders. They actually loaded us onto opposite sides of the boat. The weather was an unseasonably warm 50 or so American degrees. Perfect for sipping booze and riding bikes.

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On the Cheap Reviews Pt.2.–Rock Out With Your Rock Hawk Out

On the Cheap Reviews Pt.2.–Rock Out With Your Rock Hawk Out

As a lover of all things two wheeled and pedal powered (a bike-sexual if you will), I’ve been spending more and more time in the dirt than on the road.

Since mountain bikes and mountain bike parts have become increasingly more technologically advanced and expensive over the years, it pays to do your research and get the right parts the first time.

One of the, if not the (IMHO), most important parts on your MTB is a set of tires. After all, tires do a lot of work keeping you upright and shredding when the going gets gnar. With the ever changing trail conditions of the Pacific NW, it’s best to have a few sets of tires laying around the studio apartment for mud, rocks, dry trail, blue groove, snow, and sandy conditions.

Oh, and one set for night racing on Wednesdays.

But, if you’re on a small budget, all those tires add up. Then you can’t pay rent and you’re living in your Subaru.

Even a single set of high end tires can set you back a few hundred smackers.

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On the Cheap Reviews Pt. 1–Use Protek, son!

On the Cheap Reviews Pt. 1–Use Protek, son!

 

 

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(Disclaimer: The lawyers told me to inform the readers that this is not a sponsored product endorsement. I am not sponsored by any brand, manufacturer or other type of equipment company. I buy all of the gear, products and parts I review with my own monies. My reviews and opinions are solely my own and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of GoMeansGo or any other sane people who may be reading this.)

To piggyback on Ryan’s recent article, Tire Repair 101, sometimes you have to say “uncle” and give into buying new tires.

Tires are probably the most expensive consumable in cycling…right behind massive quantities of micro-brewed IPA’s.

Historically, the cycling masses have been indoctrinated  into thinking they need ultra thin, ultra skinny, ultra light racing tires on their road bikes, regardless of their riding style or environment. After all, we’re all aspiring to win the next Tour, despite the facts that we’re pushin’ 40 and just commuting to our soulless desk jobs at big corporations.

Right?

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On the Cheap

On the Cheap

The Seattle metro area is one of the priciest areas in the nation to call home, and while cycling has been called many things by many people, “cheap” is not one of them.

For those of us who live in and around Seattle and like to ride and race bikes, but don’t make anywhere near a six figure income, something’s gotta give.

This usually means that you find yourself sharing a $2000 a month 300 sq. ft. studio apartment with your 2 cats, a dog named Freewheel because you had one too many PBR’s one night and thought it was a good idea to name him “Freewheel,” your road bike, fixed gear bike, fat bike, SS hardtail, full suspension long travel trail bike (to show off your prowess at Duthie Hill), full suspension short travel trail bike (‘cuz it’s faster, goddammit), CX race bike, commuter bike and, since it’s Seattle, your full fendered rain bike.

You eat ramen noodles because your Safeway card gets you 10 for $1 and you’re saving up for that sweet new cargo bike so you can go car-free and  the “N+1” rule of bike ownership mathematically dictates that you need another bike or else the universe may collapse in on itself.

For those not familiar with the “N+1” rule, it states that the number of bicycles you should own is one more than you currently own (N). The same rule applies to snowboards, but that’s another blog.

Algebra’s fun!

…and expensive…..

Even though rent may be expensive in Seattle, with so many great shops in the area, building a bike doesn’t have to be.

I stumbled upon a 1993 RockHopper Comp on the local craigslist for $75. I was looking for a commuter/light touring rig on the cheap and I thought that with some creativity, this old machine may fit the bill.

While I’m not a fan of Specialized and their business practices as of late, their old frames always fit me well (short legs, short arms, round torso) and were pretty reliable pieces of steel, so I thought I’d check it out.

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