Twenty Dolla Make You Holla

Written by Neal Poland on . Posted in Bicycle, Bike Camping, Rides, Washington No Comments



Middle Fork Road just outside of North Bend, WA has been under construction in some form since dinosaurs roamed the earth. However, a series of small landslides washed out sizable sections of the road leading to some of the Seattle area’s best  hiking and camping, rendering the road impassable to any  motor vehicles short of Bigfoot V. While that sucks for those who insist on travelling by car, it’s a boon for those of us who don’t mind powering our own adventures.

I recently heard about Goldmyer Hot Springs, which is a 20 mile trek up what’s left of the Middle Fork Road to an old mining camp featuring a volcanic spring that spews hot water out of the side of a mountain like a college freshman who’s bonged one too many Peebers. At some point, someone decided to corral this spewing flow and create a couple of small jacuzzi tubs and a grotto carved into an old mine shaft…heh heh…shaft. Thus, creating the Goldmyer Hot Springs “resort.”

It is highly recommended that you call and make reservations at Goldmyer, as they only allow 20 people per day to pass through the area. There’s no just “popping in” to take a peek.

Entry to the hot springs is $15. Oddly, it’s only another $5 to spend the night in one of a handful of unique campsites. I’m bad at math, but I think there are roughly 10 sites to choose from, each with its own flavah. I chose site #1 because it was the easiest to access with my Spinnabago single speed cross bike towing a craigslist BOB trailer.

11154774_10205179267575073_4577988705517924289_oThe ride up was the longest 20 miles of my life. Single speed cyclocross bike with a trailer meant walking and portaging sections I probably could have cleaned on a geared MTB.  Live and learn, I guess. Most of the road is potholed gravel. Only a few sections are truly washed out, but probably doable on a more off-road oriented bicycle.

But not having to worry about a single car was peaceful and fantastic!

Once I got just a few miles away from the newly “improved” Mailbox Peak trailhead area, I only saw a couple of mountain bikers and one or two errant hikers the entire trip.

There is no water on the road up or at Goldmyer, so be sure to bring filtration equipment. I carry a Lifestraw with me and designate an old water bottle to crappy water duty so I don’t have to carry extra water with me all the time. Since this trip parallels the middle fork of the Snoqualmie river most of the way, stopping to refill on unfiltered water is never a problem. The river also cuts through the campgrounds at Goldmyer, so that’s handy, too. I also brought along a 96 oz Nalgene collapsible bottle to reduce the number of trips to the river once at camp.

When you “check in” with the caretakers at Goldmyer, you get your choice of a couple of sizes of bear canisters to choose from. I guess that’s what the extra 5 bucks is for. The campsites are first come first served. Since the road access is pretty much nonexistent, you should probably have your pick of the bunch. Each campsite has its own unique features, as well  as a simple line and pulley system to hang your bear can. Most have old mining equipment biodegrading away, which I thought was pretty cool. The “resort” features the nicest outhouse I’ve ever seen. It’s clean and heated with gas (no pun intended). The caretakers provide TP, Glade poop smell camouflage spray and hand sanitizer.

Glass bottles and campfires are not allowed at Goldmyer. However, you can cook on a camp stove at your campsite. I brought along my trusty $30 Esbit solid fuel stove, which works great for solo trips.  No alcohol or weed is allowed at the hot springs themselves, but you can drink at your campsite so long as things don’t get out of hand. Basically, don’t be a dick, and you should be fine.

Speaking of dicks, Goldmyer is classified as a “clothing optional” place of relaxation, so just be aware of that.

If you make a trip to Goldmyer and enjoy yourself so much that you want to stay, they are looking for caretakers for a 4 month summer stint. You are afforded a cool cabin to live in, complete with satellite TV and interwebs and a stipend to help pay for your real world bills.

11164877_10205179267095061_1781251600744071379_oGoldmyer Hot Springs


Reservation Rules and Policies


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Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail

Written by Neal Poland on . Posted in Portland, Rides, Road No Comments


I spend much of my off time volunteering with a local non-profit, working with people disabilities to help get them active in the outdoors. Last weekend, I was fortunate enough to be able to tag along for a ride with the Wounded Warrior Project down in Oregon in exchange for my homegrown “mechanical” skills.

We took a drive a 4 hour drive to scenic Hood River, which would serve as our basecamp for the weekend. While Hood River has long been known as a mecca for windsurfing and kite boarding, it’s also home to some fantastic mountain biking and road cycling.

And breweries.

Lots and lots of breweries. Of you like adult beverages, Hood River will not disappoint.

The Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail is an actual old highway that runs parallel to the current highway 84/ Oregon 30 along the banks of the mighty Columbia river like a watery Mason-Dixon line separating the states of Washington and Oregon so they don’t battle it out for Pacific NW supremacy. The complete route, which includes sections where you ride along the highway shoulder as well as fully protected sections, runs the distance between Troutdale and the Dalles.  Total distance is just over 80 miles each way.

For this particular ride, we stuck to the sections of the trail that were fully protected, for safety sake.

The trail runs along a ridge line high above the current highway, so you get great views and very little road noise. 13 or so miles are completely closed to motorized vehicles, giving riders a chance to ride at their own pace and stop when they want for photos.



Along the way are numerous parks to rest or camp at, as well as plenty of things to see. The Bonneville Dam is on the route, as is the Bridge of the Gods  and one of the PCT trail heads (for you “Wild” enthusiasts).

Even though over 300,000 people a day use this trail, the path never seemed congested, and is very family friendly. The parking at the trailheads, however, paint a different picture, so get there early.

I’m planning a trip for later in the summer where I can experience the 160 mile out and back in its entirety, so stay tuned. I’m just waiting for my brother to get settled into his new place in the Portland area, so I don’t have to pay for parking!

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4th Annual Lake to Lake Bike Ride in Bellevue

Written by Ryan on . Posted in Bicycle, Rides No Comments

I found this in the comments spam folder, which is rarely looked through- so if you have an event you’d like up on the calendar, it’s best to email us.
If you’re in the Bellevue/Seattle area- this could be a fun little ride with a low entry fee and proceeds going to a good cause.

4th Annual Lake to Lake Bike Ride, June 13, 2015

An enjoyable, non-competitive recreational ride for the whole family. Two unique loops; a mostly flat Greenbelt Loop flat 8-mile route; and the Lake Loop which is a more challenging 22-mile route. Routes are about 80% on-road and 20% off-road (gravel). The routes take riders to and through Bellevue’s award winning park system exploring hidden treasures of Bellevue. Benefits the City of Bellevue youth camp scholarship fund.

Entry fees are low.

Participants receive a t-shirt.

Custom socks to the first 150 to register.

Start and finish, Lake Hills Community Park 1200-164th Avenue SE, Bellevue, WA 98007 Ages 8 and up.

Volunteers are needed.


More info at


Ages 8 +, Under 8 must be in a tag a long or trailer

Entry fee
Pre register $15.00, day of event if space is available, $20

To register go to activity code 95182

For more information:

Day of event registration opens at 8:00 am
First riders depart at 9:00 am

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Resurrection 8 Alleycat Race 4/4

Written by Tall Bryan on . Posted in Alley Cat Racing, Bicycle Racing, DIY, Events, GO MEANS GO events, Races, Ride Your Bike, Rides, Seattle, Washington No Comments


Back for the 8th year running the Resurrection Alleycat is this Saturday April 4th. Registration starts at 2:30pm @ Cal Anderson Park. Race starts at 3pm sharp (don’t be late!) Finish and after party at Gaswork Park. Come to ride, come to race, roll the dice and with a little luck this may be your year to be champion…

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Global Fatbike Day, Anchorage. The recap.

Written by Ryan on . Posted in Alaska, Bicycle, Bicycle Racing, Events, fat bike, Rides No Comments

I got back from a shitstorm of fun on Sunday night, after an amazing weekend in Anchorage. I went up for Global Fatbike Day, and since my move back to Alaska- Anchorage is my new Portland. Turns out there are lots of dirtbag bike folks that like to drink beer and have bum fires in parks. Sure, the weather is about 50 degrees colder- but a little whiskey warms the body and good conversation warms the heart.

I met too many people to remember- but all were nice.


Time in Anchorage when coming from a town with no road out is not without the errand running to stores, purchasing things that aren’t available in Cordova. Since I’m currently doing construction, I made a stop to buy some hand tools. I also made the rounds to the bike shops, to see what might be new and interesting. Here’s what I found in my rambling around Anchorage:

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Tomorrow in Anchorage: Global Fatbike Day

Written by Ryan on . Posted in Alaska, Bicycle, Events, fat bike, Rides No Comments


Tomorrow in Anchorage and around the world, people will be straddling their fatbikes and going on rides with friends and making new ones. The majority of my trips and rides are done on my own and I’m looking forward to meeting some people in the Anchorage area. It feels a little like that time in 2006 when I showed up to a Fast Friday in Seattle- not knowing anybody, but that turned out pretty well.

Love them or hate them, fatbikes have made a big impact in the cycling world. It feels a little similar to the fixed gear boom that started about 10 years ago- though there isn’t a conversion kit for a shitty 10sp so you can get in on the cheap. Nope, these bad boys cost some dough.

Global Fatbike Day Alaska Facebook page

Anchorage info- taken from the FB

Ok folks so the details you have all been waiting for. The ride will start from West Chester Lagoon around 7. The group ride will head east on the chester creek trail towards the hillside with many chances to branch off on single track that will re-connect with the bike trail. The ride will continue on the chester creek trail making its way across northern lights and through the university/ medical center area again taking chances to ride more single track along the way. Once back on the bike trail the ride will head across the tudor overpass onto the tour trail and make a shorter loop on some campbell creek science center single tracks. Trails will most likely include blue dot, moose tracks, lynx, birch meadow, Speedway, moose meadow, lower rovers, salmon run and continuing along the tour trail back to westchester. The loop through the campbell tract trails can be done in either direction its up to you! The single tracks that turn off the chester creek trail and the tour trail will be marked come the day of the ride. We will announce what kind of marks to look for because weather may dictate one form of marker over another (marking paint on the snow vs flagging) come ride time.

I would like to stress the listed route is only a loose guideline. If you are not comfortable with any of these single track off shoots sticking to the bike path as well as the tour and larger trails like moose tracks is just fine and continuing on your way towards campbell creek science center is another option. The great part about doing that is you will most likely be constantly riding with fellow fat bikers on the way. The ride is meant to be about having some fun and be done at mellow conversation speed. The route listed above should be largely doable for some within an 1.5-2 hour range however please do not feel like you must do the entire length of route in that time. Ride as much of the route as you can and make sure to be back at the lagoon by 9 ish for the swag give away. Be sure to bring some additional warm layers so you can be comfortable while hanging around post ride. Also be sure to stash some snacks and beverages of your choice in your packs for post ride (or during the ride) up to you really.

Global Fatbike Day general Facebook pageFind your area, and go on a ride! Start one up! Be it solo or in a group- get on your bikes and ride!

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This Saturday in Tacoma

Written by Ryan on . Posted in Bicycle, Rides, Washington No Comments

Saturday, October 25th :: 7:00pm
Meet up at: BROKEN SPOKE :: Tacoma, WA
We will be cycling to various watering holes throughout the night.
Rain or dry we ride – (Folks, we’re riding bikes…how cool is that?!)
21+ and biking is at your own risk…so don’t fall down yo!
Spread the word! Tell your velo peeps!

Limited number of spoke cards! :: Don’t be late!

Tip: USE CASH it helps us get through bar lines faster so plan ahead!

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